Central Virginia Regional Library

August Recommendations

August 2021 RECOMMENDATIONS 

 

The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson

In The Splendid and the Vile, Erik Larson takes readers through the day-to-day experiences of Winston Churchill from the beginning of World War II until the end of the war.  Drawing from diaries and primary sources, documents which have only recently been released to the public, Larson provides readers with details of events as seen through the eyes of both Churchill’s “Secret Circle” and members of his family.

– Bonnie

 The Splendid and the Vile is available in print at the Farmville Library and on Libby as both an e-book and audiobook.

 

 

Naruto by Masashi Kishimoto

Come along with a young boy on his journey to become the top ninja in his village and prove to everyone that he is more than their expectations of him.  Naruto is packed with action and will keep you flying through chapters!  It is also a great book to place in the hands of any anime loving teen.  You will be heading back to the library week after week in order to check out the next part of the story!

– Brandon

Naruto is available in print at the Farmville Library and as an e-book on Libby.

 

 

The Music of Bees by Eileen Garvin

In a rural town in Oregon, three strangers form a unique and  unlikely friendship.  In spite of their varying struggles – such as grief, family, and lack of direction in life – they form a deep connection through beekeeping.

– Chelsea

 The Music of Bees is available in print at the Farmville Library.

 

 

Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs? by Caitlin Doughty

Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs? by Caitlin Doughty is a lighthearted and honest take on the questions children often have about death.  If you are curious about what happens to the body of an astronaut in space, or if you can legally send your grandma to rest on a flaming ship in mythical Viking fashion, this book is for you!

– Max

 Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs? is available in print at the Farmville Library, as an e-book on Libby, and as an audiobook on Hoopla.

 

 

The Chicken Sisters by K.J. Dell’Antonia

If you fit into the Venn Diagram of readers who love to binge watch Food Network competition shows, but also enjoy reading family dramas and stories with small-town charm, then The Chicken Sisters, by K.J. Dell’Antonia, might be the next book for you. Dell’Antonia crafted the recipe for an escapism read with a lot of heart:

  • 1 heaping cup of deep-seated family feud
  • 1 sister, who crossed lines of said family feud and needs something to go right
  • 1 sister, who strives for a “perfect” life and is about to have it all come crashing down
  • 2 fried chicken restaurants serving generations of neighbors
  • 3 days of reality food competition to bring family secrets and tensions to the surface

Combine all ingredients with a dash of communication issues, family conflict resolution, and perseverance. Step back, choose your chicken restaurant champion, and watch the sparks fly.

– Megan

 The Chicken Sisters is available in print at the Farmville Library and as an e-book on Libby.

 

 

Arsenic and Adobo by Mia P. Manansala

If you are looking for a new, cozy mystery to read look no further than Arsenic and Adobo, the first book in Tita Rosie’s Kitchen Mystery series! Meet Lila Macapagal, a young woman who has moved back home to help her aunt run their family owned Filipino restaurant. But Lila is suddenly thrust into a scandal when she is accused of murdering the local, and nasty, food critic. The mystery itself may be a little simple, but the unraveling of the story makes it worth the read. Full of Filipino culture, including recipes like Adobo and Ube Crinkles, and a diverse cast of characters, this book is sure to delight cozy mystery readers.

The second book in this series, Homicide and Halo-Halo, will be released in February of 2022.

 – Morgan

 Arsenic and Adobo is available in print at the Farmville Library.

 

 

Minari (DVD)

What began as notes written by the author Lee Isaac Chung as he reflected on his upbringing on an Arkansas farm turned into Minari, which won a Golden Globe and was nominated for six Academy Awards.  The film portrays a Korean-American family living in Arkansas’ Ozark Mountains during the 1980s as they search for a better life.

Minari is primarily performed in Korean with some English, although there are options for English and Spanish subtitles.  As new immigrants, the family speaks in both English and Korean.  Their struggles are like any other people who fighting for the “American Dream”, whether they are natural born citizens or immigrants.

According to Lee Isaac Chung, the minari is a hardy plant which can grow anywhere, can revitalize the soil, and cleans up the water if planted near a brook.  Chung felt this was poetic and reflective of the film.  I find the title descriptive of introduction of new thoughts, ideas, and cultures to a stagnant world.

– Virginia

 Minari is available at the Farmville Library.

 

 

Journey to Munich by Jacqueline Winspear

In early 1938, Maisie Dobbs is intercepted on a morning walk by Brian Huntley and Robert MacFarland of Britain’s Secret Service.  She is informed that the German government has agreed to release an important British subject from prison, under the condition that he is released into the custody of a member of his family.  Because the man’s wife is deceased and his daughter is gravely ill, the Secret Service is in need of a female agent to present herself as his daughter at the gates of Dachau.  As she travels into the heart of Nazi Germany, Maisie encounters unexpected dangers and encounters the man she holds responsible for the death of her husband.

– William

Journey to Munich is available in print at the Farmville Library and as an e-book and audiobook on Hoopla.

 

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